Concerns

Bumps & Growths

Not all bumps and growths are created equal. Some are a normal part of aging, but it's better to be sure

Seborrheic Keratosis
Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis

This is one of the most common skin growths. It may look worrisome, but it is a non-cancerous benign lesion. These growths often appear in middle-aged and older adults and can be found on the trunk, neck and along the hairline. They can start as small, rough bumps, that can slowly thicken and develop a thicker surface like a cornflake. They range in color from white, tan, brown or black.

Dermatofibroma
Dermatofibroma

Dermatofibroma

Dermatofibromas, are very common bumps that often develop on the arms and legs, sometimes from an insect bite, a previous injury or de novo. These tan. pink skin colored or brown nodules are usually asymptomatic, although sometimes they can be itchy and tender to touch. Click the arrow to learn more.

We do not usually need to remove these growths unless there is diagnostic uncertainty or a particularly troubling symptom is present, such as pain. Removal is best done surgically since more superficial treatments will cause this growth to recur.

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Sebaceous Hyperplasia
Sebaceous Hyperplasia

Sebaceous Hyperplasia

Sebaceous hyperplasia are common, benign overgrowths of oil glands, also known as sebaceous glands. They are found in middle age to older adults, and present as single or multiple yellowish, soft, small bumps on the face, particularly nose, cheeks, and forehead. If you tend to have oily skin, you may be more prone to developing these bumps. We can easily treat these in the office.

Moles
Moles

Moles

Most of us have moles, whether they are raised or flat, pink, tan, black or brown, they are our personal constellations. Most of the time, they are a normal part of who we are, but some moles can change into atypical moles or even cancer. It is best to have your moles checked by a professional at least once a year. Click the arrow to learn what to look for.

Always look for the ABCDE’s when evaluating your moles.

Asymmetry: Moles should be symmetric, not asymmetric when you cut them in half.

Border: Moles should be round or oval and not have irregular borders

Color: Moles should be one color, not multiple colors in the same mole or darker than the other moles on your body

Diameter: Moles should be smaller than a pencil eraser and should not be growing in size. They should also not be Different than your other moles. What we like to call the “ugly duckling mole” that does not fit your group of moles

Evolving: Moles should not be changing in color size or shape

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